Healthcare Marketing Ethics

Healthcare marketing ethics primarily takes into account the welfare of every patient. Medical professionals and practitioners have the moral and legal responsibility to give advice that puts the best interest and welfare of the individual patient on top.

In case of conflict between the practitioner’s fee and patient’s wellbeing, the patient should be more prioritized. For that reason, clinics and hospitals are likely to accept seriously ill patients, whether these patients are capable of paying for the healthcare services and medical treatment or not.

Healthcare marketing is different from other fields of marketing in that it has an extra obligation in accountability to the general public. Due to the greater significance of trust, every healthcare marketer should willingly offer total transparency of their strategies to let the public see the honesty and fairness in their own marketing standards.

Accuracy in every advertising endeavor plays a vital role in healthcare marketing ethics. The content of every medical-related or healthcare promotion is supposed to be as unbiased and accurate as possible, in order to keep the consumer from being encouraged to do something unimportant or unbeneficial.

In addition, according to ethics of healthcare marketing, medical professionals and organizations must neither prescribe nor suggest any treatment unnecessary for the health of the patient, only to generate bigger profits.

Health care ethics begin with the mores of an organization. If organizational mores are according to cronyism and shortcut-taking, these mores will eventually become part of the hospital’s daily operation. In cronyism, the personal interests of administrators have the advantage over those of the organization, so the administrators begin extracting benefits from the office for their friends. The existence of cronyism at a hospital results in the hiring of doctors and other health care professionals for political purposes, not for More...
Law enacted by a legislative body reflects all the ethical issues surrounding the field of health care. For instance, the HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act) of 1996 allows patients to take control of their records, ensuring the constant security of those records. In addition, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration handles issues surrounding sanitation and hygiene. Since noncompliance with ethical health care legislation might directly lead to harm for patients, health care employers and schools make a point More...
In the medical and healthcare industry, the people involved in the care of patients are always confronted with different issues that will test their judgment. But when decisions need to be made, it is always important to consider the moral principles that may be applicable to that certain situation. This is what they call Medical ethics. The world of medicine is one of the industries where the principles of the people may not go with what is expected of them. More...